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HomeCraftsCameraGo Behind the Scenes on The Hateful Eight at Cine Gear Expo

Go Behind the Scenes on The Hateful Eight at Cine Gear Expo

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Robert Richardson (left) and 1st AC Gregor Tavenner. (Photo courtesy of Panavision).
Robert Richardson (left) and 1st AC Gregor Tavenner. (Photo courtesy of Panavision).

Panavision will showcase test footage from Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight, shot by Robert Richardson, ASC in Ultra Panavision 70 at Cine Gear Expo on June 6, at 11:30 a.m. The footage will be projected in 70 mm anamorphic film at the Paramount Theater.

Giving attendees a look behind the scenes of this highly anticipated Western will be Dan Sasaki, Panavision’s VP of optical engineering, who will explain the adaptations and innovations required to shoot in Ultra Panavision 70 in 2015. Journalist David Heuring will moderate the discussion.

The Hateful Eight is the first production since 1966 (Khartoum) to shoot in Ultra Panavision 70. The anamorphic format is captured on 65mm negative and delivers a stunning 2.7:1 (roughly) image that is sharp but not clinical, with painterly bokeh and immersive depth.

Panavision collaborated with The Hateful Eight creative team to make sure the lenses and cameras would accommodate their rigorous shooting schedule in Telluride, Colo. The original tests being shown at Cine Gear are what helped to solidify the decision to produce the entire movie in a large screen format.

Panavision/Light Iron will also be exhibiting in Stage 32 (#S311).

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